Make your parent emails more meaningful with @adobespark

In this age of instant communication, the old paper newsletter that often ended up scrunched up at the bottom of the bag is a relic of the past.

Each week I send out a ‘warm fuzzy’ email where parents learn more about what’s going on in class as well as important dates coming up.  As the drafter of the emails, I had several needs not being met by email

  • No information on how many parents had read the email – Am I sending notices out into virtual void?
  • No ability to add a large number of photos or video to the email.
  • The emails didn’t look visually appealing – particularly if reading on a mobile device

Thinking from a parent’s perspective I knew that the parents wanted

  • Visually appealing information – no large blocks of text
  • Lots of photos
  • The ability to access readable content on multiple devices
  • A chance to show they’ve received the information without necessarily sending a reply

Enter Adobe Spark.

Adobe Spark is a free digital storytelling platform. Whether you’re viewing Adobe Spark Page on your phone on your computer, the results are beautifully designed and readable multi-media pages.

You can use Spark in a web-based browser or on iOS Apps. You do need a sign to access Adobe Spark, but you can use your Google Account. The bonus of the App feature is that you can create on the go, I often write my newsletters on the commute home from school. Being able to send out beautiful updates from school camp or out on field trips is another possibility.

What I love about Spark as a creator is the simplicity of the interface.

I use pages for my Newsletters.

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You then build your content using a simple interface – the only things you must include is an image, headline, and sub heading.

The rest is up to you.

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You can add text, links to videos, Photo Grids, a ‘Glide Show’ ( text is overlayed on a photo). Spark turns all your content into well-designed multimedia stories that you can then share via a link with your parents. Here’s an example of a recent newsletter from my class.

When you are finished hit the share button and you’ll get a notice like this.

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You do need to select a category. Be careful to turn off the ‘get noticed’ if you don’t want your email to be promoted on the Adobe Site.

I then share the link out via email to my parents.

One of the great features of Spark is the ability of readers to acknowledge that they’ve read the newsletter through giving some love.

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As a creator, I have access to the number of views and hearts each update received on the ‘My Projects’ page. This lets me know, at the very least, my messages are getting through but I also like seeing the hearts.

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I could see Adobe Spark being used for digital storytelling. In particular, I think it could be a great platform for digital portfolios for learners which is something I may trail with the learners next year.

 

What is your new year question? #oneword2017

Over the last few years, I’ve committed myself to the same resolution when the calendar changes to January 1. I will go to bed before 11.This is a simple goal and has a noticeable impact on my well-being.

Yet here I am mid-January wide awake and typing away on the computer at 11.30 pm.

Holidays lull every teacher into thinking we have superhero stamina. The enforced downtime enables time for reflection and results in a desire to don a cape on return to the classroom.

The result?

Edu-resolutions.

  1. Do less talking and more listening to my students.
  2. Set a timer on my watch to make transitions smoother.
  3. Email class parents with positive anecdotes about their child at least once a week
  4. Set aside time each week to make awesome wall displays of student learning.
  5. Sort out that pile of papers sitting in my filing cabinet by Friday.
  6. Get back into the habit of blogging at least once a week.

The first week of teaching reminds teachers we are mortal. By Thursday I’d broken resolution 1 and 2. Those papers will be mocking me from filing cabinet at the end of the year. By the end of the next holiday, I’ll come up with a similar mental shopping list of SMART targets.

As an inquiry teacher, I wondered why do we routinely make resolutions we don’t keep?

  • Procrastination.  Why did I wait until the holidays to decide I needed to take action?
  • Direction. What might this action achieve? Is it really worth spending my precious time on?
  • Practicality. What’s stopped me from taking action in the past? How might I achieve this goal? What might I need to stop doing?

Then the answer came to me.

Cellar Door.

Drawing on Kath Murdoch’s one word intentionally and Amy Burvall’s visual metaphor, cellar door is a euphonious metaphor for my new year question.

How might I ask more beautiful questions?

What is inquiry, if not the art of creating a more beautiful question?

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“Split personality” photos on the iPad

At the moment my class is exploring how humans use clothing to express their ideas and beliefs.

To tune into the unit we had a ‘free choice’ fashion day where the children could choose their own outfit to express their personalities.

I did an initial fashion shoot with the children where I encouraged them to pose in a way that showed off an aspect of their personality. I was sure to keep the children on the lefthand side of the photo.

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The next day, we repeated the process on the right hand side of the frame. This time, the children looked at their initial photo and tried to think of a contrasting pose in their school uniform.

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The children then inserted the two images into keynote on the iPad. Cropping one of the images and using the instant Alpha tool tool to remove any changes in lighting. They then did a quick screenshot of

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They then did a quick screenshot of the end results.

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Which show some interesting contrasts between the two sides of the children’s personality.

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Some things to be mindful of to create a clean finish

  • A clean background – we used our school’s film studio but a green/blue screen on clean wall will work just as well
  • Contrasting colours – between the subject and the background
  • Keep your camera in the same place through using a tripod
  • Get the tallest kid in your class to be the person to frame the shots
  • Keep the lighting consistent to avoid unnecessary shadows
  • Small brush strokes on instant alpha work best

It’s amazing how a change in clothes really can bring out a big difference in kids’ personalities.

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